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CoGC GU2: Scottish Wildlife — Shoot 5 Outcome

G0082141.JPGThe Highland Wildlife Park shoot was something rather quite unexpected, perhaps slightly disappointing, although can understand due to the nature of the animals and
safety of those they take on photographic tours, however for what it was worth I wouldn’t quite value the photographic day tour at £150. As the website described they would get you closer to the animals, however didn’t state how. The biggest disappointment was knowing that the tour guide for the tour was not a photographer therefore had no experience with photography which I found odd, he was a nice enough guy but again if you compare that to the day tour I did with Neil McIntyre there is quite the difference:

  1. IMG_1121.JPGNeil himself has more than 30 years of experience shooting wildlife and was able to pass on his knowledge and experience which I learned from. When doing a photographic day tour of the Highland Wildlife Park with someone who has know knowledge in photography there’s nothing to take from that.
  2. Being out in the wildlife it is more of an experience such as where to stand and how you approach. The Highland Wildlife Park we were given access to certain areas the general public wouldn’t have however still shooting through wired fencing. We were photographing the animals during their feeding time, that was a benefit but I wouldn’t value the tour at that price.

I managed to get some great pictures which I was pleased with such as the wolves eating etc, however a lot of the time we were left photographing either up or down at the animals which I felt wasn’t favourable. If I were to compare how many good images I captured through Neil’s photographic day tour to that of the Highland Wildlife Park there’s a telling G0031027.JPGdifference, then again it was to be expected as it’s a task in itself photographing through fencing and in restricted areas, especially the task avoiding capturing the wired fencing.

When photographing the animals, as expected I was pretty much limited regarding the techniques I could use and wide angle wasn’t ideal, especially when shooting through fencing and surrounding fencing to the back of the wildlife. I managed to capture the odd stunning shot however that made it appear as if I was level with the wildlife, an example being the Musk Ox which I may consider towards my final 20 images. It was difficult photographing much of the other animals due to the angles, but was pleased with shots I captured of the wolves as it appeared as if they’re in their natural habitat in the woodlands. I was disappointed with several images however such as capturing the wildlife with fencing or being slightly off focus such as the tiger and any closeups I did capture I wouldn’t quite place it as my one of my favourites.

For much of what I had captured I could have captured myself going around the park like a normal visitor. Some of the time I had to use a higher ISO for my 1_20A771050-600mm Sigma Sport lens as zoomed into 600mm the widest aperture is f/6.3 and using the faster shutter speed. I am pleased I captured a variety of shots of the different animals to give me options but will limit that as I want my final 20 to show a variety of different techniques and will only include if I feel it stands out.

The photographic day tour started at 8:30am in the morning and lasted throughout the day until 3:30pm in the afternoon. Within that time we were given a certain allocated amount of time photographing the wildlife whilst they were being fed. Thankfully I did take the Sigma Sport lens with me as I was unsure how close I would get to the animals and what I was to expect on the day.

Here is a contact sheet of some of my best shots I captured on the day:ContactSheet-001The first image of the alpha male wolf staring directly at the camera was one of my favoured portrait shots I managed to capture with the hint of the trees surrounding him, this certainly helped make the picture stand out; another shot I was fortunate to capture was one of the wolves eating a carcass showing it’s teeth, not only does it show the character of the wolf but was also pleased with the framing of the shot with the trees to make it appear as if in it’s natural habitat; the third picture was one of my best as I was lucky to capture the wolf eating with the expression on its face looking at the camera. I also captured it framed with the wood across the bottom and the tree, again appearing natural; The fourth image of the Musk Ox looking to play with another was another one of my favoured shots not just for the moment but also managed to capture them framed with raised bit of land to make it appear level with them which appears more natural; for the tiger, although a slight disappointment with it slightly off focus on the eyes but love the composition and finally one my favourite closeup portraits of a monkey with the sharp detail on its face and eyes as it calls out as it knows it’s about to be fed.

Here is a sample contact sheet of images I was disappointed with:ContactSheet-002The first image of the wolf was a disappointment due to capturing the back cross hatched wired fencing, I did try to take out in post processing but the higher ISO grain noise makes that extremely difficult. This would have been one of my best images had the wolf been closer to blur the background out more; the second image was one of my absolute favourites for the way the wolf was walking towards, again it shows the character of the wolf and loved the framing of the shot, however it was a big disappointment with the eyes completely out of focus; for the third image of the Scottish wildcat it chose to eat at the back of the enclosure with the wired fencing and shooting through the fencing was problematic especially shooting down at the Scottish wildcat; another disappointment and example shooting upward was the snow leopard on top of the rocks as you can barely make out the creature; the second shot of the snow leopard eating, again it was one of my favoured shots but disappointment due to the wired fencing you can see slightly blurred across the face of the snow leopard which ruins the overall image and finally although I loved the shot of the tiger walking towards and looking at the lens, the eyes were slightly off focus due to the woods and fencing.

A sample of post process work I did for one of my best images I began by making slight adjustments in Camera Raw, first by reducing shadows to enhance contrast in the shadows and then by increasing sharpness. I also added a slight increase to the clarity:

postprocess1

Using the Smart Sharpen tool from the filter menu I reduced the grain noise in the image as well as enhanced the sharpness by 10 to retain sharp detail on the wolf.

postprocess2

After reducing the grain noise and retaining sharpness in the detail, I used the burn tool at 2% to paint over the midtones and the dodge tool at 1% set to highlights to enhance the overall image.

postprocess3

The final touch I made to the photograph was by adding slight colour desaturation. I began by duplicating the second background layer, then choosing Image > Adjustments > Desaturate from the Image menu. From the layers palette with the 3rd background layer selected I reduced the opacity of the layer from 100% to 20% for a more realistic look.

postprocess4

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COGC Graded Unit 2: Scottish Wildlife-Highland Wildlife Park: Shoot 5 Research

article-1222317-06EBFF9A000005DC-935_964x575Having researched in the past about the highland wildlife park I was well aware that there was photographic days that you could book and pay for. From past and recent research I’m more than positive it enables you to get closer to the animals. This would be ideal for capturing some fantastic closeup images that I would like, although I do feel, like Edinburgh Zoo, I maybe limited with techniques I could use; uncertain whether I’ll capture some environmental shots such as wide angle, depends on available space and as mentioned before I want the pictures of the wildlife to appear natural without certain hindrances such as wired fencing etc. I’m aware that around the Highland Wildlife Park there is wired fencing, whether or not they allow photographers in with the animals is yet to be seen. However if shooting behind wired fencing I know that using shallow depth of field it will allow me to blur the wired fencing to capture whatever subject in focus. Like Edinburgh Zoo I would imagine it will be dependent on where the animal is situated, if close to fencing I won’t be able to use as I would prefer to blur that out from background.

wolvesI had researched the weather forecast for the photographic tour, although the weather is forecasted to be bad, if the weather is bad it would be good to capture images of the wildlife with dramatic lighting if possible. The tour starts at 8:30 in the morning before the park opens to the public so I need to ensure I am there in time and it will last throughout the day until 4pm and the photographic day tour costs £150 per person. As mentioned on the official website of the Highland Wildlife park, the photographic day tours get you close to the wildlife so I’m hoping to use my 70-200mm f/2.8 for the wide open aperture, may also use my 24-70mm f/2.8 as it would be nice to capture some wide angle portraits of the wildlife. The photographic day was booked in advance and is for April 29th. Food and drink is provided in morning.

My main target for this photographic tour is to capture some stunning images of some of the other wildlife on offer to see in Scotland, I’m fairly confident that I can capture some maxresdefaultother techniques when I go to shoot the seabirds, if I can pull off any at the Highland Wildlife Park it would be an added bonus. Due to having visited before in the past I’m more than aware of what is on offer so I do hope to capture a good variety which I feel will really add to my final 20 images.

The Highland Wildlife Park is situated in the Cairngorms region of Scotland and given the size of the place I feel there is better opportunity to capture the animals to appear as though they are in their natural habitat.

You can find the source for this research at:

http://www.highlandwildlifepark.org.uk/events-experiences/photographic-days/